Sprouted Barley Butternut and Beet Salad

Jump to Recipe

This Sprouted Barley Butternut and Beet Salad is a great way to introduce yourself to sprouted grains if you are unfamiliar with them. I love salads like this. A blend of whole grains, awesome fruits and veggies, and a tasty dressing (this one was a warm maple dressing). I served this salad warm, the first time, then the leftovers chilled. I can tell you it was really good both ways! You can’t go wrong here!

Sprouted Barley Butternut and Beet Salad

What Are Sprouted Grains and Why Use Them?

While most people are familiar with whole grains, a recent poll I took with my Instagram followers showed me hardly any are familiar with sprouted grains. So, here is a little info about sprouted grains, then I will tell and show you how to sprout. Consuming sprouts during their germination period increases the nutrients you get from the grain. A great article about this from Harvard explains better. I don’t sprout as often as I should, but really love it when I do.

How to Sprout Grains

To start with you will soak your grains. I used Barley in this recipe, but you really can use just about any grain you want! So, soak your grains for an hour or 2. Drain the water, rinse and cover again. Do this 2 or 3 times. Then drain and get ready to let the grains work their magic.

sprouting barley in quart mason jar

Set the jar at an angle and allow it to sit overnight. I have sprouting lids, but they were wide mouth. I couldn’t find those jars, so I had to carefully balance it in this bowl to let it jar and sit. Here are some great lids here if you don’t have some already. If you don’t want to purchase any other lids, you can always cover with cheesecloth and secure with a rubber band.

sprouting barley in one quart mason jar

By mid-afternoon the next day, these were the barley I had sprouted. Can you see the little leg coming from the grain? It is ready to go! You can let it go longer if you want, but I like them at about this point. Now, the grains are tender, but I wanted to cook for an even more tender grain.

I added them to a pan of salted boiling water and cooked for about 5 minutes. It won’t take long, but I wouldn’t skip this step.

Caution on Sprouted Grains

One thing I need to note, there are and have been cases of food born illnesses from sprouted grains. I would really like to know how many of those cases are from home sprouted whole grains and not the store-bought alfalfa sprouts. The sprouts like that are where I hear most of the cases come from. If you are worried, here are a few precautions. Make sure and rinse the grains well, don’t them sit too long in the water ( it is the moisture and temperature that make them candidates for bacteria growth), then refrigerate whatever grains you don’t use right away. Again, this is just a precaution. I have never had anything from them, and neither has anyone I know!

Baking the Butternut Squash

Let’s start roasting the butternut. I only want to use half my squash, so that is all I peeled. I peeled the neck, but whatever you want. So, peel well.

peeled butternut squash on wooden cutting board

Then I cut it off the squash.

Then cut it into moon shapes. You can cut it in the thickness you want, mine were about 1/4 inch .

Roast at 425 degrees until tender.

Beets in a Pressure Cooker

Have you ever cooked beets in a pressure cooker? This method is new to me, but I am sold!!So, prep just like you would for roasting. Cut off the greens and wash the beets well. Place them in your pressure cooker with about a cup of water. If you have a steamer basket, use that. I didn’t and it was just fine.

Pressure cook for 15 minutes then do a natural release. Peel your beets and you are ready to go. See, I told you, so simple right??

Warm Maple Dressing

I served this salad warm the first time and wanted a warm dressing to drizzle on it. Since this was a fall-flavored salad I would go with a maple dressing.

I always mix my dressings in mason jars. It is so simple just to shake and not dirty a whisk! Once it is mixed, throw it in the microwave for about 10-15 seconds.

Assembling the Sprouted Barley Butternut and Beet Salad

Everything should be coming together at this point. The grains have been cooked as have the beets and butternut squash. Drain your grains and cut the beets.

To this salad I also added some dried cherries, pepitas, and pistachios. I am telling you, this salad has it all.

I only mixed it at the last minute as the beets dye everything a nice pinkish-red hue! Drizzle with the dressing and carefully mix. You want to be careful not to break up the butternut squash when you are mixing.

Here is the finished, beautiful salad. It was just wonderful.

If this salad isn’t what you are looking for, I have plenty of other options. Check all these ideas out!

Print Pin
0 from 0 votes

Sprouting grains

Sprouting grains does take a bit of time to do, but it really simple! Plus the nutritional value, taste, and texture make any effort worth it!
Course grains
Cuisine American
Keyword fall salad ideas, how to sprout grains, sprouted barley, sprouted grains
Prep Time 5 minutes
resting time 1 day
Total Time 1 day 5 minutes
Servings 6 servings
Author Amy- A Red Spatula

Equipment

  • mason jar, sprouting lids or cheesecloth.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup barley or other grain of choice I have also done white wheat and rye with great results on both
  • water enough to cover the grains with about 1-2 inches over.

Instructions

  • Rinse your grains well.
    Place in a mason quart canning jar.
    Add enough cool water to cover the grains about 2 inches over.
    Allow the grains to sit in the water about an hour. It is good to cover your grains, just so no bugs happen in. You can either use a sprouting lid, like I did, or even cheesecloth.
    Rinse, fill with water again to cover and allow to sit another hour.
    Rinse again and tip your jar upside down to drain. I balanced mine upside down in a small bowl. The jar will need to be covered with a sprouting lid or cheesecloth tied on with a rubberband.
    The grains will need to sit like this for about 12-36 hours. This will depend on the temperature of your house and the grains.
    I like to use mine after I see the small sprout starting to poke out. The grains will be nice and tender at this point. You can let them continue to grow if you prefer, up to about 1/4 inch.
    For the salad I created with this recipe, I boiled about 4 cups of water with 1 teaspoon salt. Once it came to a boil, I added the grains and allowed them to boil about 5 minutes. Once it had boiled for the time, I drained and added to the salad.
    Whatever you don't use right away, refrigerate for safety. I have never had anything happen, but better to be safe!
    Now, sit back and enjoy any way you prefer!! You deserve it!
Print Pin
0 from 0 votes

Sprouted Barley Butternut and Beet Salad

This hearty, healthy and tasty salad is the perfect dish for fall!
Course Salad
Cuisine American
Keyword healthy butternut salad ideas, sprouted barley, sprouted grain recipe ideas, sprouted grain salad, sprouted grains
Prep Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 6 servings
Author Amy- A Red Spatula

Ingredients

  • 3 cups sprouted barley recipe included in post
  • 3 cups chopped butternut squash
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup chopped roasted beets recipe in post
  • 1/2 cup pepitas
  • 1/4 cup pistachios
  • 1/3 cup dried cherries
  • 1 recipe warm maple dressing recipe included in post

Instructions

Roasting butternut squash

  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
    Line a baking sheet with parchment and set aside.
    In a small bowl, drizzle olive oil over butternut squash then sprinkle with the salt.
    Lay in single layer on parchment lined baking sheet.
    Place in oven and bake until the squash is tender.

Assembling the Salad

  • Combine all ingedients and mix carefully with a rubber spatula. I try not to mix too much as the beets dye EVERYTHING! I also set asdie some of the pepitas and cherries to place on top after plating, you can do this too if you choose.
    Whatever is not eaten the day of can easily be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 3 days.
    Now, sit back and enjoy. You deserve it!!
Print Pin
0 from 0 votes

Warm maple dressing

This is the perfect dressing for any fall squash or even a warm grain salad.
Course Salad
Cuisine American
Keyword fall salad ideas, maple dressing, maple vinaigrette, warm maple dressing for salad
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Amy- A Red Spatula

Equipment

  • mason jar

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons dijon mustard
  • salt, to taste

Instructions

  • Mix the olive oil, maple syrup, red wine vinegar, and dijon mustard in small mason jar. Tighten lid and shake well.
    Start with 1/4 teaspoon salt, mix again and taste. Add more if needed.
    To warm the dressing, place in microwave for about 10-15 seconds. It will heat quickly, so be mindful.
    This is perfect on any fall salad or roasted squash!
    Now, sit back and enjoy. You deserve it!
Print Pin
0 from 0 votes

Beets cooked in a pressure cooker

This is the simplest way to cook beets! They are ready to go in about 30 minutes. So easy!
Course Appetizer
Cuisine American
Keyword beets cooked in pressure cooker, pressure cooker beets, pressure cooking vegetarian
Prep Time 3 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
release time 10 minutes
Total Time 28 minutes
Servings 6 servings
Author Amy- A Red Salad

Equipment

  • pressure cooker

Ingredients

  • 3-5 beets
  • 1 cup water

Instructions

  • Prep your beets for cooking by removing stems and washing well.
    Place in pressure cooker with water. If you have a steam tray, add that in before adding the beets.
    Seal your pressure cooker. Set for 15 minutes on high pressure.
    Once the timer has gone off, allow for the natural release. When the pressure has been released, carefully remove the lid.
    The beets will be very hot, of course, so be careful. They are ready to peel at this point.
    Now, sit back and enjoy. You deserve it!

About The Author

Amy

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating